AMRT Responds to call for hiker with injured knee in the area of Dawn Mine - May 1, 2016

Altadena Mountain Rescue Team responded to a call for a female hiker with a knee injuyr located near Dawn Mine. Field crews searched the area north of the mine, while Air Rescue 5 searched the south end of the canyon.

Air 5 located the victim approximately 1/2 mile south of the mine and hoised her into the helocipter. She was transported to Farnsworth Park, at which time she was treated by members of the Altadena Mountain Rescue Team and Los Angeles County Fire. She was then transported by ambulance to Huntington Memorial Hospital

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Tragic ending in the search for a missing mountain biker - January 29-30, 2016

The Altadena Mountain Rescue Team received notification of a missing mountain biker Friday January 29th just before 9:00PM. Team members responded to the AMRT headquarters and began prepping for a late night search. Because of the large amount of terrain to be searched, AMRT called in Montrose SAR to assist.

Based on information from the missing mountain bikers riding partner, teams were deployed to various locations to cover as much ground as possible.

While rescuers searched throughout the night, the team leader began to prep for increased efforts at first light. Calls were made to surrounding teams, with support from Sierra Madre, San Dimas, Santa Clarita and Malibu arriving for a 7:00AM deployment.

LASD Air Rescue 5 was utilized to insert teams into the mountains and expand the search to cover more trails and recanvas trails initially searched in the dark.

Members of the Altadena Mountain Rescue Team had prepared a missing persons flyer from images provided of the missing person with his bike. These were distributed at first light to hikers and bikers at the trailheads.

Shortly after 10:00AM on Saturday January 30th, a call was received from a mountain biker who noticed a tire in the bushes. The informant had heard about the missing person from others on the trail that had handouts. Upon further inspection, he discovered the bike and body of the missing mountain biker.

Two members from AMRT were a short distance away, and upon arrival secured the scene while Air Rescue 5 dropped a paramedic down to the location. The paramedic pronounced the missing mountain biker at the scene. He was later transported via Air Rescue 5 to Farnsworth Park. The cause of death was not known at the time the operation was concluded.

The Altadena Mountain Rescue Team would like to thank everyone who responded to aid in the search. It is never a good day when the end of an operation is a recovery and not a rescue. Our hearts go out the victim and his family.

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Church group members saved by Altadena Mountain Rescue Team – December 5, 2015

The Altadena Mountain Rescue Team received a call at 4:45PM on December 5th regarding three hikers stranded atop the waterfall in Eaton Canyon, in the Angeles National Forest. AMRT, along with the Parks Bureau, responded into the area, establishing a command post at the Eaton Canyon Nature Center. The lost hikers, part of a 50 person church group, separated from the main group and become stranded atop the falls, unable to get down.

Altadena Mountain Rescue Team members hiked up canyon and made the difficult ascent up to the top of the falls. Because of terrain erosion over the recent months from heavy rains, portions of the trail were no longer considered passable by the members on scene. After scouting a location suitable for an anchor, members rappelled down to the victims, ages 12, 26 and 26. All three were uninjured, however, all were complaining of being cold as the temperatures dropped into the low 50’s and neither was dressed appropriately. The victims were provide with warm clothing while a lowering system was rigged to get them safely to canyon bottom.

Once on canyon bottom, the victims were hiked out and then transported to the command post at the Nature Center, where they were reunited with the waiting members of their group.

This operation concluded at 9:45PM

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Father-Daughter time turns into Father-Daughter rescue – November 21, 2015

At approximately 7:15PM on November 21st, the Altadena Mountain Rescue Team received a call regarding a father and daughter stuck on a ridge in Rubio Canyon. Communication via text message was established with the father and he was informed that AMRT was in route.

From the Rubio Canyon trailhead, team members were able to visually locate the victims from their flashlights glimmering on the side of the hill. We proceeded into the canyon to better identify their exact location and develop an extraction plan.

Team members tried to approach the victims from above and below, with both routes initially proving to be unsuccessful. The team members approaching from below readjusted their approach and were eventually able to reach the victims. The father and daughter were safely secured at the location while crews from above rigged a lowering system. Both victims were lowered, along with a rescuer, to the canyon bottom and hiked out. This operation concluded at approximately 12:30AM.

It was discovered during a post-rescue interview that the father and daughter had been hiking the better part of the day and had taken a wrong turn, ending up on a steep scree slope that let them to a steep ridge. Because of the loose terrain they were unable to safely backtrack to the main trail. Wisely, the father decided to call for help instead of risking injury.

These hikers were prepared, with food, water, flashlights and proper clothing. Not all hikers are as prepared. As temperatures stay cool, with lows approaching 30 degrees locally, be sure to carry extra layers. You never know when you may take the wrong trail and end up stuck on a ridge.

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Photo credit @LasdDan

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When training turns to reality – November 15, 2015

The Altadena Mountain Rescue Team was out early Sunday morning for our monthly team training exercise. This month had the team working on ELT (Emergency Location Transmitter) and L-per directional finders.

The morning began early for the “victims” in the training operation, as two team members made their way into the Arroyo Seco to place the ELT and stage a member portraying the injured pilot of a downed aircraft.

As three groups of team members were fanned out across the local mountains to begin the process of locating the ELT, the two members located in the Arroyo Seco took the available time to assess the condition of some of the trails in the area. This area of the Angeles National Forest sees heavy usage, especially among mountain bikers. Being familiar with the main trail and any spur trails in the area is vital.

Having hiked to the debris basin and assessed a side trail, the AMRT members made their way back to the location of the ELT, crossing paths with numerous mountain bikers and a few trail runners along the way.

Once back at the location of the ELT, while reviewing the medical scenario to be presented to the first team on scene for the training operation, the training turned into a real rescue operation.

A trail runner, coming down from the debris dam, stumbled and fell to the ground approximately 100 feet up trail from the AMRT members. From her reaction it appeared she had suffered an injury to her right ankle. The two AMRT members approached the victim and her companion, introduced themselves and asked if she needed medical assistance. Initially she thought she would be able to make it out of the Arroyo and back to her vehicle with the assistance of her running companion. Attempts to place weight on the ankle proved otherwise.

At that time, the training officer called an end to the team training and informed the team of the now active rescue operation. While waiting for the arrival of a litter and additional team members, the members on scene prepped the victim, splinting her right ankle and cleaning a wound on her left knee.arroyo 11 15 2015 01


Because team members were deployed locally for the training, they were quick to arrive with the litter and litter wheel needed to transport the victim down trail to a team vehicle. Once at the team vehicle, the victim was transferred from the litter and driven, along with her companion, to their personal vehicle.

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There have been many times a training exercise has been cut short because of a call for a real operation. This may be the first time team members actually witnessed the incident they incident that caused the injury.

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